A Whiff of Strike in the Air

I was going to talk more about audiobooks today, but since there is talk of a SAG-AFTRA strike regarding interactive (ie video game) contracts, I thought this would be worth discussing. The actor Wil Wheaton gives a good explanation on why he voted to strike which is worth reading at least to understand the situation more fully.

The big argument everyone brings up is that it is due to residuals. Unlike many other forms of acting, video games don’t come with residuals. So that AAA title you bought with a massive cast of actors that allows you to immerse yourself in a whole ‘nother world? Yeah, those actors only get paid for the sessions.

I’m not SAG-AFTRA, although I fully intend to join. I think the union is a good thing. With rates going down the toilet, the union is more important than ever. I also think the union can be more than a little out of touch. For instance, their view that non-union talent can’t perform as well as union is utter nonsense. And heaven forbid you choose to go Fi-Core and play both sides!

As a voice actor who has done more than a few games, I would love to get residuals. But most of the titles I work on are indie titles, and there is absolutely no money to pay actors. So the real question is should the companies producing AAA titles pay residuals? Yes. They should. The fact is the video game market is growing, not shrinking. As technology continues to advance, with devices like the Occulus Rift and virtual reality technology it’s only going to grow. So yes, of course the AAA title companies can afford it. What’s more, it’s interesting how these companies who have increasingly turned to Hollywood celebrities to voice games clais they are too poor for residuals. I find it difficult to believe that an actor like Kiefer Sutherland got paid scale to lend his voice to Metal Gear.

But as Wil Wheaton points out, it’s not just about rates. One of the other terms SAG-AFTRA claim has been rejected is for shorter voice sessions. Currently 4-6 hour sessions are not uncommon for video games, though thankfully not so much in the indie world. Four to six hours doesn’t sound that long, but when you’re screaming, whispering, making death cries, yelling and breathing hard, it is taxing on the voice. It strains the vocal cords, and very often your voice is unusable the next day. You can’t audition for stuff, you certainly can’t work another job. This one for me is a biggie. When I first heard that sessions were getting longer in LA I couldn’t believe it. I’ve done the shouty, death yell sessions, and I couldn’t imagine sustaining that for four much less six hours at a time, yet this is what major game companies are supposedly rejecting.

Honestly looking at the verbiage of the SAG-AFTRA letter that went out, I think both sides are gearing up for an ugly battle. Or as someone described it, a bitter divorce, with a whole lot of he-said/she-said. I’ll be interested to see what happens next.

In other news, I did an interview with author P.J. Fox. Our new audiobook The Demon of Darkling Reach should hopefully come out next week! Additionally, my latest audiobook, Compendium was also released this week. I’m very proud of this book. It was a fun book to read, and hopefully listeners will enjoy it.

Until next time!

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