You Get What You Pay For

Hello! I’m back. I’m feeling refreshed. Mostly. It wasn’t quite the Staycation I let on. We went camping up in the San Juan Islands where I was forced to disconnect entirely. Seriously, we were closer to Canadian cell towers than U.S. Ones. This was good for me. I came home feeling far less guilty about not checking mail. Inevitably, I missed out on an audition from my agent while I was gone, but there’s always the next audition.

Since I’ve been back I finished my last audiobook project, The Demon of Darkling Reach, which should be coming out in a couple of weeks. I went to the Seattle Public Library sale and stocked up on fun books to read. 32 books, including some rare finds, for $50! And now I’m just twiddling my thumbs waiting for the next gig. No. Not really. But I do admit to that familiar anxiety rising: “Wait! I don’t have another project lined up already?” That’s when desperation kicks in. I’ve had to fight that a lot over the years. Taking jobs that I know aren’t right for me, or don’t pay enough, because I’m impatient. “ Are my rates too high? Am I scaring people off?”

I won’t lie. I’ve been told often enough by authors that they can’t afford my rates. To be blunt, they would much rather I work for free. And who wouldn’t take free over paying out a couple of grand? If you can attract a great narrator with clean audio to your project for free, that’s great, but most likely that narrator will want to get paid. Sure there are plenty of people who will work for free to build their resume and I certainly can’t compete with that, but is it really worth it? Let’s talk value.

What do you get from the narrator that charges $200-$400 per finished hour? Well, for starters, you get experience. I’ve recorded 16 audiobooks. I guarantee you I’m more experienced than that person offering to work for free. I’ve had training. I started as a stage actor, and then a voice actor, and transitioned into audiobook narration. I have trained with Pat Fraley who is one of the most well-known audiobook coaches in the business.

You also get quality. I have a dedicated booth which you can see in the image above. I own studio quality gear that I have put together over the years. Not only do you get that, but you also get professional editing and proofing. I hire professionals to do this for me because while yes, I could do this stuff myself, it takes me longer and I will inevitably make more mistakes than a dedicated editor and proofer.

Because I only take paid work, I am able to invest in the productions I work on. Whether that is gear, editors, or training to make me a better narrator. It’s my cost of doing business, but it’s also what sets me apart from those working for free. So, the next time you’re considering creating an audiobook for free, don’t think about the costs, consider the value. Because when those reviews come in complaining about the poor audio quality or crappy editing, those are going to stick around for a long time.

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